Volume 7, Issue 5 (1-2015)                   ijme 2015, 7(5): 36-49 | Back to browse issues page

XML Persian Abstract Print


Download citation:
BibTeX | RIS | EndNote | Medlars | ProCite | Reference Manager | RefWorks
Send citation to:

Zahedi Anaraki F, Larijani B, Karimi B, Tirgar S, Khazali K, Tirgar S, et al . Fate of the malformed fetus in Mulla Sadra’s philosophy. ijme. 2015; 7 (5) :36-49
URL: http://ijme.tums.ac.ir/article-1-5473-en.html
1- MD , Medical Ethics Unit, Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran;
2- Professor, Medical Ethics and History of Medicine Research Center, and Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Medical Ethics and History of Medicine Research Center, and Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran;
3- Dentist Researcher
4- MD, Medical Ethics Unit, Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Medical Ethics Unit, Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; , s-tirgar@farabi.tums.ac.ir
5- Assistant Professor Department of Islamic Maaref, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran;
6- MSc Student MSc Student
7- MSc Researcher;
8- Researcher Researcher and lecturer in Quran and Islamic Science
Abstract:   (4175 Views)
Abortion has remained a subject of intense controversy in medical ethics, particularly in the case of malformed fetuses. Review of the existing literature on the issue indicates that there are two main challenges in this regard: firstly, the question as to whether a malformed fetus has the right to live, and secondly, the fate of the soul (vegetative and animal) after induced abortion.This descriptive research presents different viewpoints in order to investigate the aforementioned questions in Mulla Sadra’s philosophy with a focus on the “right to live”. The results of the study demonstrate that according to Mulla Sadra’s theory, all fetuses possess potential human souls even if they are extremely malformed or disfigured. He considers the fetus a vegetable with the potential to convert into a human. Based on this ideology, which encompasses both creation and resurrection, the malformed fetus has the right to live. The assumption is founded upon Mulla Sadra’s Theory of Substantial Motion, which implies that abortion may influence the evolution of the soul in the limbo period (intermediate state) after abortion and might even affect its resurrection. It can be concluded that in the Iranian society, which has an Islamic background, theological views should be considered in decisions about abortion. It should be mentioned, however, that philosophical approaches alone cannot be relied on for decision-making regarding the abortion of a malformed fetus. Furthermore, interdisciplinary contributions are indispensable to a thorough analysis of this controversial issue so that the ethical challenges surrounding abortion in such cases can be overcome.
Full-Text [PDF 241 kb]   (1888 Downloads)    
Type of Study: review | Subject: اخلاق پزشکی
Received: 2015/01/11 | Accepted: 2015/01/11 | Published: 2015/01/11

Add your comments about this article : Your username or Email:
CAPTCHA code

Send email to the article author


© 2017 All Rights Reserved | Iranian Journal of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine

Designed & Developed by : Yektaweb